Wealth is something that is discussed ad nauseum in modern culture. This notion acts as the very groundwork of society, our essential ultimatum. That being said, it is quite rare that we actually inquire into the nature of wealth and attempt to understand its true significance. Perhaps this would be a good time to do so.

 

Of course, when people speak of wealth they are most often referring to material wealth, but surely this does not capture the essence of what it means to be truly wealthy. Material wealth cannot possibly encompass the state of internal wealth that is experienced when we come to know who we are beyond name and form, beyond the workings of the ego. Our true nature cannot be contained by such boundaries.

 

Money cannot buy happiness, as anyone with any sense already knows. The pathological pursuit of money is merely a form of escapism, a method of avoiding the facing of one’s true self.

 

Wealth, an abiding sense of inner richness and abundance, is only brought about when we abandon the ego. This is to say that it is only once we have alleviated our consciousness of the need to identify with this or that, the proclivity to be totally associated with the world of form, that we may truly feel wealthy.

 

Feeling wealthy is more important than having money.

 

When we let go of personal identity, self-image, we elicit this overarching feeling of wealth, this quality of abundance.

 

The abundant mind is then free of the ego, removed from any sense of being identified with form. As counter-intuitive as it seems, it is only when we are no longer attached to personal identity, the story of “me”, that we may come to live with inward abundance.

 

Inner wealth takes precedent over outer wealth, even though they very often move hand in hand together. This is to say that as long as we remain bound by the ego, this thought-identified sense of self, it is irrelevant how much money we have because we always feel poor, always move from a sense of scarcity.

 

We come to live abundantly through dissolving the ego, for the ego is always poor. It only knows scarcity and lack. It lives in a perpetual state of wanting, and thereby must be let go of if we are to be lastingly fulfilled, inwardly wealthy.

 

The obvious question then is how might we go about doing this? How might we bring about a sense of inner wealth through dissolving the ego?

 

This is quite simple, but it is so simple that we most often miss it.

 

All we need “do”, is live in the present. That’s it. When we are engaged with the present moment directly, the ego ceases to be empowered and we invariably move towards a state of internal wealth.

 

To give credence to the immediacy of felt experience, that which arises in this very instant, is to step outside the workings of the ego. Herein, name and form no longer act as boundaries. The idea we have of ourselves ceases to be in charge.

 

When we live wholly in the present, our true nature is evoked. Our most natural processes are allowed to unfold, and therein our innate propensity towards living abundantly and with a lasting sense of inner wealth and satisfaction is brought about. Here, we are whole. Here, we are happy. Here, our deepest and fullest potential can be met.
So, true wealth is brought about when we dissolve the illusory sense of being an isolated individual, a separate “me” entity. Once the ego ceases to act as the driving force of consciousness, we then move into abundance, and this is attained through the embodying of that which arises in the here and now.

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